Nadia Tariqi breaks family restrictions to realize her childhood dream

Foto:Privat

- One of my goals in Sweden is working for women's rights.

- I speak Persian, Azeri and English, but Swedish is much difficult than all of them.

- My advice to newcomers “ you should not forget you are guest and must respect to new rules in this home. You must immigrate with your mind not just with your body."

For the third year in a row, writer and poet Nadia Tariqi of Iran lives in Sweden. Nadia has always dreamed of becoming a writer and poet in the future. But she had to obey her father to study the field He chose. In an interview with Mosaic, Nadia spoke about her education:-

- I have B.A (bachelor degree) in Law. I was going to start job as a lawyer in Iran but it was not my choice. All my life I liked literature and my dream was to be a poet and writer in future. But my father asked me to study in Law. I obeyed and I did my education.

Nadia's motivation to leave her motherland and come to Sweden to build a new life was the harsh and brutal laws of family and society against women. Or ridiculous brutal laws as described by Nadia.

- I wanted write without censorship and fear. In 2016 I decided to come to Sweden via student visa at Linnaeus University and then I have started my activities as a writer in this country and I published my first book under title of "Smiles From Tears". Meanwhile I applied for short term residency at " Free Speech House " and that place and my coordinator Cecilia Jonsson, offered me many opportunities to make network and know about cultural issues which I always appreciate it. Nadia Says.

Nadia worked After that with the project. She still going forward and works on new books which are a novel and a collection of short stories based on different stories from lives of different people.

-I love to write about people. In my idea everyone has an story to tell. Nadia commented.

What do you hope to achieve in Sweden?

- One of my goals in Sweden is working for women's rights. I think this is my duty to help women who do not have freedom and their lives are full of fear and rules of patriarchy.

Since you have come to Sweden, have you been encountered any difficulties?

-Yes. Firstly, regarding I live alone in Sweden and I do not have any family member here, sometimes I face so difficult moments. It is not easy that you open your eyes in the mid night and think about your venturesome journey and your future challenges without anyone around. Secondly, About my experience with language. I speak Persian, Azeri and English and recently I have finished SFI and I am going to continue study at SAS. But I must to confess for me Swedish is much difficult than all of them.

How do you plan to settle in Sweden?

- I am going to find a job related my skill and work in cultural issues and keep working on writing and share my stories with people. This is my childhood dream and I never give up. On the other hand I am dead serious to work for women's right and I grab all opportunities in this case.

Is there anything you would like to say to newcomers to Sweden?

- My advice to newcomers: Leaving your home land is one of the most difficult things in the world. But when you decide to do that, you have to check all aspects of it.‌ You must know this is not a trip full of fun and prosperity. You should not look back and regret the past. You are allowed to be sad but you should not stick in the sadness. You have to learn to tear and then remove your tears and lift yourself up. You should be strong and hopeful. Fortunately this country gives you rights and facilities to improve your life, but you should not forget you are guest and must respect to new rules in this home. You must immigrate with your mind not just with your body.